external parasites & wound care

The medical advice tendered here is purely out of our own experience and the veterinary advice we have sought in those particular situations. This has been published on this website purely as a reference guide; we maintain that the best thing to do would be to take your animal to a TRUSTED veterinary professional, or at the very least, to describe the situation in detail to a vet and perhaps send pictures, and follow their advice. If all else fails, please ask your vet if the medicines described here would be safe for your particular animal, for her particular illness. It is difficult to take matters into your own hands, unless you know exactly what you are doing.

If an open wound is seen without the presence of maggots and flies, a thick layer of Himax ayurvedic ointment may be applied liberally on the wound and surrounding areas.

This has the desired effect of accelerating wound healing as well as keeping flies away, but is water-soluble so it’s a good idea to apply it at least two-three times in a day. For non-serious wounds, even once or twice a day may be enough.

If, however, the there are multiple, deep wounds on the body a veterinary consultation is required. If you can observe the presence of maggot eggs, larvae or flies, please refer to the section “Maggots”.

Amongst the most common and serious instances of parasites is the dreaded maggot. The threat of maggots and flies persists almost throughout the year, making matters worse.

Any open wound on an animal is a sure-shot target spot.

In our experience, we can say that treating an open wound as soon as it is found on the animal’s body is a far more effective thing to do than waiting to see if it becomes a target for maggots and then proceeding to treat it.

If an open wound is seen without the presence of maggots and flies, a thick layer of Himax ayurvedic ointment may be applied liberally on the wound and surrounding areas.

This has the desired effect of accelerating wound healing as well as keeping flies away, but is water-soluble so it’s a good idea to apply it at least two-three times in a day. For non-serious wounds, even once or twice a day may be enough.

But if there is a wound in/around which maggots and flies have been detected, the simple use of Himax is usually not enough.

We generally employ the following protocol –
1. Spray the wound and surrounding area liberally with Himalaya Scavon spray. This has the effect of literally driving maggots out of the wound.

2. Apply Negasunt powder liberally. This is easier if it’s a surface wound, but most often with maggots, the wound goes very deep, very fast. In case it is not possible to get the powder all the way into the depth of the wound, a solution may be made with plenty of Negasunt powder and a few drops of CLEAN, DISTILLED water (if the water is boiled, please wait for it to cool before making your solution!). This solution must not be kept for long; it should be immediately poured into the wound. It may help to use a syringe WITHOUT the needle for this purpose.
The Negasunt powder/solution will kill the maggots which have not been driven out by the spray. The key is to ensure the powder or the solution successfully reaches the depths of the wound.

3. Himalaya Scavon ointment may also be used at this stage; it is to be applied generously on the wound. This is a maggoticidal as well as a wound healer.

4. Finally, a uniform layer of Himax ayurvedic ointment should be applied. It is always a good idea to keep Himax for the end, and not mix up the order. Himax will prevent a further infestation of flies.

This protocol should ideally be kept up with multiple times in a day; a bare minimum of twice.

It goes without saying that maggot wounds are very painful and stressful for the dog. The treatment does not offer immediate relief to the animal, it predictably increases the immediate discomfort. However please don’t get discouraged by this as maggot wounds left untreated will ALWAYS result in a slow, excruciating death for the animal.

It may be a good idea to perhaps call a friend or family member to help you out, unless it’s a dog fully familiar with you.

Dogs that are fed or otherwise petted/taken care of by you will never bite, but for a dog that’s not as familiar, buying a muzzle may be a safe option that doesn’t cost much.

With maggot wounds, what we’ve seen is that the first few days of treatment, there appear to be minimal signs of the wound getting better (even with following the treatment multiple times a day). This can be quite disquieting for the human who administers the treatment.

However, according to the severity of the wound, around the fourth or fifth day, things appear to get better and rapidly so. In the next couple of days, the wound dries up fast. Please keep continuing the treatment even after the wound appears to get better.

After new skin/scar tissue has appeared, you may modify the protocol to apply just the Himalaya Scavon spray/Scavon ointment and then Himax ointment.

If the wounds show no signs of healing after four-five days (this is unlikely), it is better if you can take the animal to a vet, followed by keeping the dog at home for a few days till you feel the situation gets better.

These parasites, although leaving the dog in a lot of discomfort, are easier to treat than maggots. They can also be potentially dangerous. The developmentally-challenge puppies and the threat of developing tick fever always looms large.

To rid your dogs of these parasites, simply using a Spot-On treatment works wonders. The effect of the treatment kicks in a couple of days after the successful application of the solution. However care must be taken that the application spot does not get wet for at least two-three days, if not a week, after application.

For stray dogs of average size, Spot-On (10-20kg) works well. For larger dogs, this can be used. For puppies and smaller adults, this.

The instructions on the packaging may be followed. For bigger sized dogs, applying the solution at two points can be considered. One as per the usual point (on the back, between the front two shoulder blades) and second (on the back, closer to the tail area).

Make sure none of the solution reaches the fur instead of the skin – this would render it quite useless. Part the fur carefully and apply it straight to the skin. This not difficult as it doesn’t leave the dog in any discomfort.

Close Menu